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MASSACHUSETTS 

HORTICULTURAL 

SOCIETY 




1964 

FLOWER SHOWS 



All will be held in 
HORTICULTURAL HALL 

except the Spring Show 

Camellia Show 

January 9-10 

Spring Show 

March 14 through 22 
Wonderland Park 

African Violet Show 

April 18-19 

Daffodil Show 

May 4-5 

Tulip Show 

May 18-19 

Iris Show 

June 4-5 

Rose Show 

June 15-16 

Hemerocallis Show 

July 24 

Children's Show 

August 19-20 

Harvest and 
Chrysanthemum Show 

October 15-18 

( Dates subject to change ) 



CONTENTS 

Board of Government 

Committees of the Society 

Results of the Balloting 5 

Reports of Officers and Committees 

President's Address (j 

Report of the Secretary 

Report of Committee on Exhibitions Ill 

Report of Committee on Prizes 14| 

Report of Committee on Children's Gardens . L c 

Special Medal Awards 1£ 

Garden Committee Awards 2( 

Awards of the 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society ... 21 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1962 ... 3 

Report of the Treasurer 3 

Report of Committee on Library 4 

Books Added to the Library 4! 

Gifts to the Library 4! 

Benevolent Fraternity 

Fruit and Flower Mission 5 

Honorary Members . 5 

Necrology 5 



Bequests to the 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 



5 J 



Photos: Genereux and Fay Fot 

Our Cover Illustrations 

Top left — Weston Nurseries naturalistic garde 

at the 1963 Spring Flower Show 
Center left — Your library, one of the finest horti 1 

cultural libraries in The World 
Bottom left — National Association of Gardener! 

chrysanthemum garden at the Fa 

Flower Show 
Center right — Fitchburg Paper Company's priz 

winning, attractive surroundings 
Back Cover — Arrangement by Mrs. C Wya 

Bragg, Wollaston, at the 1962 Li* 

Show 



1963 YEARBOOK 



OF THE 



MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL 



SOCIETY 




ANNUAL REPORTS for 1962 

AND 

A LIST of BOOKS ADDED TO the LIBRARY 



FOREWORD — The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the 
honor to present herewith the 39th number of the Society's Yearbook. 

Boston, Massachusetts, July 1, 1963, Edward Dane, Chairman 



Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield 

Elected a Trustee, 

May 6, 1963 




Frederick S. Moseley III 

Elected a Trustee, 

May 6, 1963 



BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 



President 



Vice Presidents 



Trustees 



Treasurer 



Assistant Treasurer 



Oliver Wolcott 

Edward Dane 
Harold W. Knowlton 

Oliver F. Ames (1964) 

Albert C. Burrage ( 1966) 

Edward Dane* 

Robert N. Elwell ( 1964) 

Mrs. John M. Hall ( 1965 ) 

Dr. John R. Havis ( 1965 ) 

Allen W. Hixon ( 1966) 

Seth L. Kelsey ( 1966) 

Harold W. Knowlton* 

Milford R. Lawrence ( 1965 ) 

Frederick S. Moseley III ( 1966) 

Miss Helen C. Moseley (1964) 

Harold D. Stevenson ( 1965 ) 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield ( 1966) 

Mrs. Roger S. Warner ( 1965 ) 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster ( 1964) 

Oliver Wolcott* 

Dr. Donald Wyman ( 1964) 

Edward Dane 

Oliver F. Ames 



Secretary Arno H. Nehrling 



♦Members ex-officio. Dates are those of expiration terms. 



Committees of the Society 
For the Year Ending May 1, 1964 



Executive Committee 

Oliver Wolcott, Chairman 
Oliver F. Ames 
Edward Dane 
Seth L. Kelsey 
Harold W. Knowlton 

Finance Committee 

Oliver Wolcott, Chairman 
Oliver F. Ames 
Edward Dane 

Budget Committee 

Oldter Wolcott, Chairman 
Oliver F. Ames 
Edward Dane 
Seth L. Kelsey 
Harold W. Knowlton 

Committee on Building 

Olp7er Wolcott, Chairman 

RORERT N. ELWELL 

Harold D. Stevenson 

Membership Committee 

Rorert N. Elwell, Chairman 
Allen W. Hlxon 
Frederick S. Moseley III 

Committee on Exhibitions 

Harold D. Stevenson, Chairman 

Edward Dane 

Dr. John R. Havis 

Seth L. Kelsey 

Mrs. William A. Parker 

Committee on Prizes 

Milford R. Lawrence, Chairman 
John Hurley, Co-Chairman 
Allen W. Hixon 
Harold W. Knowlton 
James Sutherland 

Committee on Library 

Alrert C Burrage, Chairman 
Rorert N. Elwell 
Mrs. John M. Hall 
Harold W. Knowlton 
Mrs. Edwin S. Werster 
Dr. Donald Wyman 



Committee on 

Lectures and Publications 

Edward Dane, Chairman 
Oliver F. Ames. 
Dr. John R. Havis 

Committee on Special Medals 

Dr. Donald Wyman, Chairman 
Harold W. Knowlton 
Milford R. Lawrence 
Harold D. Stevenson 
Mrs. Roger S. Warner 

Committee on Gardens 

Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield, 

Chairman 
Oliver F. Ames^ 
Mrs. John M. Hall 
Alexander I. Heimlich 
Frederick S. Moseley III 

Committee on 

Children's Gardens Exhibitions 

Mrs. Roger S. Warner, 

Chairman 
Mrs. Charles F. Hovey 
Henry G. Wendler 

Committee on the 

Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Alrert C. Burrage, Chairman 

Dr. John R. Havis 

John Hurley 

Miss Helen C. Moseley 

Harold D. Stevenson 

Nominating Committee 

Milford R. Lawrence, 

Chairman 
Mrs. John M. Hall 
Dr. John R. Havis 
Harold D. Stevenson 
Mrs. Roger S. Warner 



Results of the Balloting 

at the Annual Meeting 

At 4 o'clock the polls were closed, 70 votes having been cast, and the 
following persons were declared elected: 

President: (for one year) Mr. Oliver Wolcott 

Vice President: (for two years) Mr. Harold W. Knowlton 

Trustees: (for three years) 

Mr. Albert C. Burrage, Mr. Allen W. Hixon, Mr. Seth L. Kelsey, 
Mr. Frederick S. Moseley III, Mrs. G. Kennard Wakefield 



Reports of 
Officers and Committees 

Presented at the Annual Meeting, May 6, 1963 

The Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was 
held at Horticultural Hall, Boston, on May 6, 1963 at 3 p.m. with the 
President, Mr. Oliver Wolcott, presiding. He appointed as tellers Miss 
Anne Sullivan, Mrs. Lorraine Cantalupo and Miss Priscilla Curtis. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the Executive Secretary, read the call for the 
meeting. By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous Annual 
Meeting was waived. The following addresses and reports were read: 




Mrs. Edwin S. Webster's charming orchid garden at the Spring Flower Show 
Awarded the Antoine Leuthy Prize 



The President's Address 

The details of the past year will be covered in the reports of the 
officers and committee chairmen. It was a successful one, though 
the deficit, while considerably reduced, was still substantial. 

During the year Arno H. Nehrling, our Executive Secretary 
since 1947, asked to be relieved of that post, though fortunately 
he will continue as Director of Exhibitions. Also Miss Dorothy 
Manks, who has run the library with such pleasant efficiency, 
announced that she was retiring on August 1, 1963. 

We are saddened by these changes, but confident that Carlton 
B. Lees, who becomes Executive Secretary and Director of Pub- 
lications on June 1, and Mrs. Muriel Crossman, who will assume 
the duties of Librarian on August 1, will measure up to the high 
standards of their predecessors. 

Among the Trustees, Walter Hunnewell and Harold S. Ross, 
mainstays of the Board for many years, have declined renomina- 
tion. They will be missed. 

The thanks of the Society are again due to our exhibitors, our 
staff and our committees, and in special measure to the Revere Rac- 
ing Association, Inc., which not only again contributed their facilities 
free of charge, but enlarged those facilities in a way that enabled 
the 1963 Spring Flower Show to be of such distinguished excellence. 

Oliver Wolcott 
President 




Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, your Executive Secre- 
tary for over 17 years asked to be relieved of 
the responsibilities of that position so that 
he can devote more time to promoting the 
Flower Shows. Mr. Nehrling will still con- 
tinue as the Director of Exhibitions for the 
Society 



Mr. Carlton B. Lees, formerly Di- 
rector of the Pennsylvania Horti- 
cultural Society, was appointed 
your new Executive Secretary and 
Director of Publications, assuming 
his duties June 1, 1963. He would 
like to meet you all personally, so 
do come in and become acquainted 





Mrs. Muriel C. Crossman, now 
Assistant Librarian, will become 
your new Librarian as of August 
1, 1963, upon the retirement of 
Miss Dorothy S. Manks. Mrs. 
Crossman is well versed in 
horticulture, as well as being an 
experienced librarian 



Report of the Secretary 

It gives me great pleasure to present my Annual Report as Executive 
Secretary to the members of the Society. 

Requests for advice and gardening information are received daily at 
Horticultural Hall by phone, mail and personal conference and the build- 
ing is in constant use by a variety of horticultural groups. Letters are 
even received from abroad as a recent one with the following question — 
"I plan to visit the United States for two weeks. I am mainly interested 
in horticulture. What should I see?" Every effort is made by our staff to 
assist members as well as the general public in solving their garden prob- 
lems and furthering the knowledge of horticulture. Our library is con- 
stantly in use by students and teachers who are in need of assistance to 
solve research problems assigned to them. 

Our librarian, Miss Manks, is frequently called upon to give profes- 
sional advice on operating and maintaining a horticultural library, as 
she has developed an ideal system for classifying and cataloging horti- 
cultural information. At the present time she is assisting the librarian of 
the Worcester Horticultural Society, as well as the Horticultural Society 
of New York. 

The attendance at our Winter and Spring Lecture Series has been most 
gratifying. The speakers included many outstanding leaders from all 
parts of the country as well as Mrs. Dorothy Cooke, who is active in 
the affairs of the Royal Horticultural Society, England. 

This year, Mrs. Lucien B. Taylor of Dover conducted four courses in 
practical horticulture for the Society: in early Fall "Practical Gardening 
Course I," in late Fall "Greenhouse Gardening Courses I and II," and this 
Spring "Practical Gardening Course II." These courses are open to both 
men and women and those who enroll are high in their praise of the 
value of the information obtained. 

Our annual field trip to the Arnold Arboretum is scheduled for May 
18. Each year the attendance increases which proves this popular event is 
appreciated and enjoyed by our members. We are grateful to Dr. 
Howard, Dr. Wyman and the members of the Arboretum staff who 
devote one of their Saturdays to cooperate in making this interesting and 
instructive tour of the Arboretum possible. 

The Committee on Gardens deserves special thanks for seeking out 
and visiting outstanding gardens to select those worthy of recognition 
by the Society. The award winning gardens will be open to members 
and their friends May 24 and 25 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. We are grateful 
to the owners of these gardens for their wholehearted cooperation. 

I regret to report the passing of Mr. Ben: P. P. Moseley of Ipswich on 
April 4 who was awarded the H. H. Hunnewell Medal in 1960 for an 
estate showing rare skill and beauty. His lovely place was always open 
to members of the Society. 

8 



Our membership shows a slight increase; the renewal rate is good, 
but we need new members, and hope something can be done to help 
build up our membership, so essential to meet our ever increasing costs. 

It is gratifying to report $10,500 received as deeds of gift from three 
individuals — Miss Helen Guild $4,500, Mrs. Helen S. Coolidge $5,000, 
and Mrs. Andrew C. Wilson $1,000. These donations are deeply appre- 
ciated. 

The interest in our magazine HORTICULTURE has never been 
greater. We now have representatives in the field contacting garden club 
groups who sell subscriptions to their members to raise money for various 
worthy garden club projects. The income from subscriptions showed an 
increase of $10,000 for the first three months of 1963 proving this method 
beneficial. 

Mr. Harold D. Stevenson will report to you on our recent Spring 
Flower Show which many of our visitors felt was one of the best ever 
staged by the Society. The additional area at the entrance proved to be a 
valuable asset. 

President Wolcott has already mentioned the resignation of Mr. Walter 
Hunnewell and Mr. Harold S. Ross as members of the Board of Trustees. 
They were members of the Board when I came to the Society in 1933 and 
I have never worked with two finer men who always had the welfare of 
the Society at heart. President Wolcott has also told you Miss Manks is 
retiring this August. I feel blessed that she was our librarian during my 
regime for she was helpful to me in many, many ways. 

Since this is my last report to you as your Executive Secretary I wish 
to doubly thank all those who have been so helpful over the years — the 
officers and trustees of the Society, the chairman of committees and their 
members, and especially the staff at Horticultural Hall for their assistance, 
loyalty and interest in the welfare of the organization. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Arno H. Nehrling 
Executive Secretary 



% 



Arrangement by Mrs. Frederick 
Good Jr., Cohasset, Mass., at the 
Spring Show 

John Taylor Arms Award 




Arnold Arboretum's educational exhibit at the Spring Show 

Au ardedthe Bulkley Medal of the Garden Club of America, a Gold Medal and 

an Educational Certificate from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 



10 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

If the members and guests present will pardon a little reminiscing on my 
part, perhaps it will bring into clearer focus some of the problems we face 
at the present time. 

Having started exhibiting thirty years ago and continuously each year 
for the next twenty-five, plus being a member of the Exhibition Committee 
for sixteen years, the last five serving as your chairman, one is bound to be 
cognisant of the changes that take place. 

During those years the attendance has varied from 55,000 or 60,000 up 
to nearly 130,000 people. The income has varied also. From a low low 
when the Bubble we had two years ago burst, showing a loss; up to a 
profit one year of $75,000.00. 

Five years ago we lost a wonderful place in the Mechanics Building for 
putting on the Spring Flower Show. Its rambling nature and especially 
the height of the main hall, lent itself admirably to spectacular exhibits. 
The balcony with its large seating capacity where people could look down 
on the exhibits and enjoy the organ music became an integral part of 
the event. 

In 1959 we tried using Horticultural Hall and Symphony Hall together, 
but the results were disappointing. Every endeavor was made to secure a 
larger hall within the city limits but none were adaptable to our needs. 

In 1960 we were graciously invited to use the facilities of Wonderland 
Park, where we have been for four Spring Flower Shows. Each year for 
the last two years the area has been expanded. From the many comments 
heard during and after this last spring show, it was the best staged in this 
location, in fact many felt it equalled some of those held in Boston. The 
new Patio area, opened up for the first time this year, certainly added 
immeasurably to the feeling of space, which had been lacking. Our attend- 
ance was nearly 90,000; an increase of about 3,000 more people than last 
year. Our profit though will only be in the vicinity of $17,000.00 to 
$18,000.00 because of higher installation costs and added premiums. 
Careful planning for the coming year will be essential to reduce this 
expense as much as possible. 

Our main problem then is attendance. We really need a gate of 
100,000 people or more. The publicity this year was exceptionally good, 
still we did not get the throngs needed. What is it that is lacking? Is it 
because we are located outside the city proper; is it lack of height; more 
effective exhibits; lack of sufficient space, or lack of seating? For the 
present we have no alternative and are grateful to have Wonderland Park 
for this particular show. Incidently, we have accepted their invitation to 
hold it there in 1964. When the new Exhibition Hall in the Prudential 
development is completed, serious consideration will be given to a change, 
if conditions and costs are feasible. 

Perhaps this explains in some measure to the members why there have 
been such fluctuations in attendance and profits. Regardless of the above, 

11 



Report of the Committee on Exhibitions 

your committee is trying in every way to maintain the highest quality in 
exhibits and striving to make the show interesting as well as instructive 
to all who love plants and gardens. 

Eight other shows were held during the year and the number of people 
attending totaled better than 17,000. This was a gain of 1,500 more than 
last year. The greatest gain was at the Harvest and Chrysanthemum 
Show which totaled 5,000 people. All of these shows were a credit to the 
Society. Next year an additional show will be held in May, featuring 
African Violets. 

I have found this year, as always, wonderful cooperation with the 
exhibitors, the trade exhibitors, all the various mechanics, the officials of 
Wonderland Park and the staff of the Horticultural Society. Maybe a 
smile and a good sense of humor help; anyway for the most part every- 
thing functioned smoothly. 

For years there has been the greatest respect, the closest cooperation 
and mutual understanding with the Director of Exhibitions, Mr. Arno 
Nehrling, and it is gratifying to know that he will still continue on in 
that capacity next year. The success of these shows over the many years 
attests to the fact that they have been master-minded by one who knows 
how to obtain the desired results. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold D. Stevenson, Chairman 
Committee on Exhibitions 




Mr. Seth L. Kelsey, left, receiving the Gold Medal of the Philadelphia Flower 
Show, Inc.. from Mr. Harold Stevenson for the Kelsey-Highlands Nursery 
exhibit at the Spring Flower Show 



12 




North Shore Horticultural Society exhibit at the Spring Flower Show 
Awarded the New York Horticultural Society Gold Medal 

Maine garden, staged by the Community Garden Club of Hamilton 
and Wenham at the Spring Flower Show 

Awarded the Mrs. Edwin Sibley Webster Cup 




13 



Report of the Committee on Prizes 

On behalf of the Committee on Prizes we express the thanks of the 
Society to many competent judges whom it has been our pleasant 
privilege to appoint, for their conscientious work in a far-from-easy task. 
When the individual exhibits are of the high caliber produced in the 
Autumn Show and particularly in the recent Spring's major exhibition, 
the judging is indeed a challenge. 

In discharging our Committee's assigned duty of making many of the 
Special Awards we are guided to a large degree by the point scores as 
determined by the judges specially appointed for the various classes. 
Which exhibit, for example, is the "most beautiful" one in the show? 
Which best "stimulates interest in horticulture," and which is the "most 
meritorious" of all, to deserve the President's Cup? In every case these 
awards, and those of the Society's gold, silver and bronze medals, have 
been made by the unanimous vote of this Committee after long and 
thorough deliberation. 

Serious consideration is being given to suggestions from various compe- 
tent sources that a special group of nonlocal highly qualified judges be 
appointed to make the seven major awards at the Spring Exhibition each 
year; the President's Cup, the New York Society's Gold Medal, the 




Mi. Millo.d l\. Lawrence, left, presenting Mrs. Chester S. Cook a Gold Medal 
"I the Massachusetts Horticultural Society for her accomplishments with floral 
arranging 



14 



Report of the Committee on Prizes 

Pennsylvania Society's Gold Medal Certificate, the Gold Medal of the 
Philadelphia Flower Show, Inc., the Antoine Leuthy Prize, the Beatrix 
Farrand Silver Bowl, and the trophy of the Massachusetts Department of 
Agriculture. We welcome constructive suggestions at all times. 

We support the idea that more prominence should be given to the 
Wonderland Cup, generously donated by the Wonderland management 
to be awarded to that exhibit in the Spring Show which receives the 
highest popular vote, so that it may be a well-earned and meaningful 
award. 

Because this Committee on Prizes does much of the judging at the 
smaller shows throughout the year, we are keenly aware that, in general, 
exhibits in these shows are particularly well done, and deserve higher 
commendation than sometimes seems to be accorded them. 

We enthusiastically welcome the Society's new Executive Secretary, 
Mr. Carlton B. Lees, and assure him of our full cooperation throughout 
what we confidently believe will be a long and pleasant association. 

At the same time we rejoice that Mr. Nehrling who has served in that 
office most faithfully for so many years, will continue his outstanding work 
in the equally important position of Director of the Exhibitions for the 
Society. Our constant gratitude goes, as always, to him and to the Staff, 
as well as to the Officers, Trustees and active members of the Society. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Milford R. Lawrence, Chairman 
John Hurley, Co-Chairman 
Committee on Prizes 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

Weatherwise, 1962 was a very poor year for Children's Gardens. The 
season was very cool and dry with the mercury reaching a high of 89 
degrees only one day during the entire summer. There was only one real 
beneficial rain in the Boston area less than a week before the show. This 
was too late to aid the gardens much for the show. Total rainfall for the 
year was 7.5 inches below normal at the time of the 1962 show according 
to the United States Weather Bureau at Boston. 

Not until June 25 were funds finally made available by the Boston 
School Committee for the full scale operation of the eight-acre school 
garden on the Cummings Estate in Woburn. In the meantime, the Junior 

15 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

League of Boston again operated the large school garden on Paul Gore 
Street in Jamaica Plain. True Tower of the Norfolk County Extension 
Service and George Yetman, F.F.A. Advisor at the Norfolk County Agri- 
cultural High School, agreed to carry on the 4-H — ; F.F.A. section of the 
Children's Show. This section of the show was transferred in 1962 from 
the small side hall to the upper exhibition hall to provide the necessary 
increase in space. Leo J. Bergeron, Director of the Brockton Home and 
School Garden Program, notified the committee in late June that the 
Brockton Program was operating "full steam ahead." Everyone went all 
out to have the 1962 Children's Show at the usual high level of excellence 
for the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 

When the show opened the count showed 1,389 entries, 131 more than 
1961 and almost 300 more than 1960. The 4-H — F.F.A. Section in itself 
had 680 entries. Some of the high-entry classes were green tomatoes 79, 
summer squash 37, ripe tomatoes 36, cucumbers 32, sweet corn 31, and 
beets 30. 

The outstanding exhibit of the Children's Show came from the Boston 
School Garden at Woburn, a 125-square-foot exhibit staged by the chil- 
dren, under the direction of Mr. Walter Shaughnessy, Supervisor, and 
his Assistants. The quality was such that it was awarded the Society's 
Gold Medal and a Special Medallion from the Massachusetts Department 
of Agriculture. 

The agricultural students from Jamaica Plain High School and the 
Norfolk County Agricultural High School, under the guidance of their 
instructors, again staged excellent competitive exhibits at the 1962 New 
England Spring Flower Show. Juniors participated with adults in the 
greatest horticultural show of the New England area. What better way 
is there of training the exhibitor of tomorrow? 

The Annual Harvest and Chrysanthemum Show in October likewise 
saw juniors competing with adults. The children and staff from the 
Boston School Garden at Woburn staged a 50-square-foot Gourd Display 
in the lower hall which was awarded a special prize. Thirty entries in 
the individual plate vegetable classes netted the junior gardeners 19 firsts 
and nine seconds, a striking example of what properly guided children can 
accomplish. Proceeds from these prizes will be used to supplement the 
milk fund and provide the children with iced milk bars during the hot 
summer days of 1963. 

With special thanks to all who worked with the children and the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society, especially Arno H. Nehrling, another suc- 
cessful year was completed for the Junior Gardeners of Massachusetts. 

Henry G. Wendler 

for the 

Committee on Children's Gardens 

16 




Norfolk County Agricultural School's informal garden at the 
Spring Show 

Awarded a Silver Medal 



Women's Exhibitions Committee exhibit at the Spring 
Show, arranged by Mrs. Bruce Crane and her grower, 
Mr. Carl Deame. 



Awarded The Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 




17 



Recipients of the S< 

Mr. Oliver Wolcott, President of the Society, announces the Special Medal 
Awards, presented annually to individuals, commercial firms or garden institu- 
tions that have contributed outstandingly to the advancement of horticulture. 




Henry Francis du Pont 



THE GEORGE ROBERT WHITE 
MEDAL OF HONOR: 

To Henry Francis du Pont, Winterthur, 
Delaware, owner and developer of the 
Henry Francis du Pont Museum and its 
associated gardens and arboretum. For 
these grounds he has selected ornamental 
plants for display in formal plantings and 
has developed native woodland areas into 
gardens with great taste and beauty ex- 
hibiting the best of the arts of horticul- 
ture. As a devoted enthusiast in the field 
of horticulture he has contributed gener- 
ously of his knowledge and skill to aid 
America's arboreta, botanical gardens and 
horticultural societies. 



THE THOMAS ROLAND MEDAL: 

To Karl P. Jones, skilled amateur horti- 
culturist and rosarian. He has a large and 
beautifully landscaped garden at his 
home, in Barrington, Rhode Island. The 
rose plantings include species — both oid 
and modern varieties — and future intro- 
ductions being tested by him for firms all 
over the world. There are espakered fruit 
decs which he has budded and trained 
himself; a collection of cultivated varieties 
of blueberries; and specimens of rare trees 
and shrubs, all of which make this a gar- 
den of exceptional interest and diversity. 
For the past ten years Mr. Jones has been 
President of the New England Rose 
Society. He welcomes visitors and is ever 
reach to share his knowledge by giving 
information on problems of care and cul- 
ture especially of roses. 




Karl P. Jones 



18 



l Medal Awards 



THE SOCIETY'S LARGE GOLD MEDAL: 



To Mrs. Chester S. Cook, a genuine 
artist in flower arrangement. For 
twenty-five years Mrs. Cook has ex- 
hibited arrangements of beauty and 
distinction at the flower shows of our 
own Society and at major events at 
the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and 
the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. 
She headed the first Flower Show 
School of the Garden Club Federation 
of Massachusetts and has been on its 
Executive Board for over twenty years. 
Her leadership in the New England 
Spring Flower Shows, the Garden Club 
Federation of Massachusetts and the 
National Council of State Garden 
Clubs has won her international recog- 
nition as lecturer, teacher and ac- 
credited judge, taking her to every 
state in the Union and to Canada, 
England and Ireland. 




Mrs. Chester S. Cook 



THE SOCIETY'S LARGE GOLD MEDAL: 




Brian O. Mulligan 



To Brian O. Mulligan, Director of the 
University of Washington Arboretum. His 
work at the Arboretum has won him an 
enthusiastic following among the Garden 
Club groups of the area, and a growing 
leadership in horticultural circles of the 
Pacific Northwest. Mr. Mulligan's pro- 
fessional accomplishments have included 
Presidency of the American Association 
of Botanic Gardens and Arboretums, and 
many committee assignments for the 
National Shade Tree Conference, the 
American Horticultural Council and the 
American Horticultural Society. His writ- 
ings include many stimulating articles in 
the Bulletin of his own Arboretum and a 
most important study, "Maples Culti- 
vated in the United States and Canada." 



19 



Garden Committee Awards 

The Board of Trustees awarded the following medals on the recommen- 
dation of the Committee on Gardens, Dr. Donald Wyman, Chairman. 

The Society's Gold Medal 

To Dr. and Mrs. William L. Davis, Winchester, Mass. 

A series of well planned, mature gardens, mostly in the shade, nestled 
under tall trees on a rather steep slope. The combination of different 
gardens, formal and informal, connected by sloping path or steps, is 
living evidence that these have been worthy examples of good planting for 
many years. 



To Fitchburg Paper Company, George R. Wallace, Chairman of the Board, 
Fitchburg, Mass. (Illustrated on the front cover.) 

The executive offices of this busy industrial concern are surrounded 
with a sweeping lawn, setting for a pond about which are featured many 
kinds of plants native in the countries where this particular firm does 
business. A small, well planted court in the center of the building adds 
a restful touch. 




Garden of Dr. and Mrs. William L. Davis, Winchester, Mass. 
Awarded a Gold Medal 



20 



To Mr. and Mrs. William H. Vanderbilt, Brookline, Mass. 

A dignified planting about the house, making excellent use of gardens 
observed from both sides of a large living room, brings a country aspect 
to a modern dwelling in the midst of Brookline. 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Vanderbilt, Brookline, Mass. 
Awarded a Gold Medal 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Brown, Newton, Mass. 
Awarded a Silver Medal 



21 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Harrower, Fitchburg, Mass. 
Awarded a Silver Medal 



The Society's Silver Medal 

To Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Brown, Newton, Mass. 

This is a skillfully designed garden next to a busy golf course. A steep 
slope of only 60 feet in width has been so planted with small rockery, 
pool and hidden terrace as to make this extremely difficult lot an intimate 
garden. 

To Mrs. Irving W. Fraim, Waltham, Mass. 

A garden in the older section of Waltham where hemeroeallis are fea- 
tured, together with many kinds of perennials and rare shrubs, this is 
the result of the sustained interest and energetic work of the owners. 
Larger than might be expected in this crowded city, there is a hidden 
walk and several beautiful informal plantings well molded into one com- 
plete garden which is certainly of interest throughout the year. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Norman Harrower, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Actually a series of gardens about a house designed in the French style, 
1 1 lis is an example of horticultural planting seldom seen today. A green 
garden, a memorial garden and a beautiful terrace, at the base of which 
are two ten-foot Alberta spruces, are only some of the interesting features 
in fin's planting. 



22 



To Mr. and Mrs. Phillip W. Lown, Newton, Mass. 

Well hidden by trees and shrubbery from abutting properties, this 
small garden surrounds a low brick house. An excellent foundation 
planting, a small extremely well-kept lawn with flowering cherries and 
crab apples as feature trees, combine to make an example of what can be 
done on a small plot with proper planning and planting. 

To Weston Nurseries, Hopkinton, Mass. 

This extensive display garden was built in front of the new Garden 
Center bordering Route 135, where massive rocks are arranged so many 
of the trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants sold by this nursery may be 
displayed to good advantage. 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Overly, Harvard, Mass. 
Awarded a Bronze Medal 

Left, Garden of Mrs. Edgar W. Cottle, Harvard, Mass. 
Awarded a Garden Certificate 

Right, Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Phillip W. Lown, Newton, Mass. 
Awarded a Silver Medal 




23 



The Society's Bronze Medal 

To Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Overly, Harvard, Mass. 

An interesting garden hewn out of a wooded hilltop. One of the 
unusual features is a thicket of gray birch trees, the trunks of which 
lend a ghost-like appearance to the wooded area. On natural rock out- 
croppings native junipers and bayberry have been augmented with a 
few exotic plants, thus bringing native and exotic material together in a 
delightfully well-planned manner. 

To Mr. and Mrs. George R. Wallace, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Built about a modern home, this garden features unusually steep slopes 
of lawn area. The flower and vegetable gardens have been placed at an 
elevation higher than the house itself and beautiful trees have been placed 
at the perimeter of the garden to soften the precise formal planting about 
the house. 



The Society's Garden Certificate 

To Mrs. Edgar W. Cottle, Harvard, Mass. 

A wild garden on one side of the house balanced by a formal lawn and 
large trees on the other and separated by long rows of clipped arborvitaes 
with perennials at the base. 

To Fitchburg Youth Library, Fitchburg, Mass. 

A well-kept patio planting in a children's library where youngsters learn 
to appreciate the beauty and interest of plants, especially when reading 
and studying on the patio. 

To Woburn National Bank Branch, Dexter S. Johnson, President, 
Woburn, Mass. 

A neat and colorful planting about a small, one-story branch bank, 
this is an example of the wise use of limited space. The yews, roses and 
other plants, though few in number, have been tastefully placed and 
mulched with crushed stone (eliminating a lawn), thus reducing main- 
tenance. 



The Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 

To Mr. and Mrs. John Dane Jr., Brookline, Mass. 

A kitchen, a second-floor porch off the bedroom and a terrace have 
been added on the garden side of this lovely Brookline home so the 
owners might better enjoy their beautiful garden. 

24 




itiiiitif^ 

Home of Mr. and Mrs. John Dane Jr., Brookline, Mass. 
Awarded the Albert C. Burrage Porch Prize 



Mrs. Franklin d'Olier, left, and Mrs. John K. Willcox, chairman of The Planters 
Garden Club, Philadelphia, admiring the Society's Gold Medal Certificate for 
their exhibit at the Philadelphia Spring Flower Show 




25 



xMr. Albert C. Burrage, left, presenting 
the Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase to 
Mr. Alexander I. Heimlich, Woburn, 
for the most outstanding exhibit in 
1962 — his Hillside Rock Garden. 





Mr. Oliver Wolcott, left, Presi- 
dent of the Society, congratulating 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut 
Hill, on receiving the Antoine 
Leuthy Prize and a Gold Medal 
for her Tropical Garden featuring 
orchids at the Spring Show. Illus- 
trated on page 5. 



Mrs. Roger S. Warner, 
left, congratulating Dr. 
Richard A. Howard on 
accepting the Bulkley 
Medal of the Garden 
('I ul) of America for 
the Arnold Arbore- 
tum's exhibit at the 
Spring Show. 




26 



Awards of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

The George Robert White Medal of Honor is considered the highest horti- 
cultural award in America and is given once a year by the Board of Trustees 
of the Society to the man or woman, commercial firm or institution, in the 
world that has done the most in the opinion of the Trustees to advance interest 
in horticulture in its broadest sense. The gold medal was designed in 1909. First 
recipient was Prof. Charles S. Sargent, Director of the Arnold Arboretum. 
The Jackson Dawson Medal is awarded from time to time by the vote of the 
Trustees, for skill in the science and practice of hybridization and propagation 
of hardy, woody plants. The first medal was awarded in 1927 to Lambertus C. 
Bobbink, Rutherford, New Jersey. 

The Thomas Roland Medal is awarded from time to time to men and women 
who have shown exceptional skill in horticulture. It was designed by Mrs. Oakes 
Ames in 1927 and was presented that year to Thomas Roland, Nahant, Mass. 
Its face bears appropriately the representation of a cypripedium orchid, Mr. 
Roland having been particularly fond of cypripediums. 

The Large Gold Medal is the highest award of the Society, awarded by the 
vote of the Trustees on recommendation of the Committee on Gardens, for 
gardens showing unusual skill in arrangement and management; and on vote of 
the Trustees to garden superintendents who have done eminent service in the 
promotion of horticulture. It is also awarded to persons, institutions and com- 
mercial firms for eminent horticultural accomplishments or for outstanding 
service to this Society. This medal was first awarded in 1845. 
The H. H. Hunnewell Medal is awarded from time to time to the owners of 
estates of not less than three acres in extent who shall lay out and plant them 
with the most rare and desirable ornamental trees and shrubs, in the most taste- 
ful and effective manner, developing the capabilities of the locations in the 
highest degree, and presenting the most successful examples of science, skill and 
taste, as applied to the embellishment of a country residence; the trees to be 
under the most thorough cultivation, the grounds in high keeping, and the prize 
to apply equally in cases where proprietors take professional advice, as well as 
when acting on their own judgment in their improvements. The first medal, 
designed by John Paramino, was given to the Hunnewell family. 
The Antoine Leuthy Gold Medal is awarded for the best display of flowering 
or foliage plants. Both commercial and private gardeners are eligible. 
Gold Medal Certificate. Given during the war instead of a Gold Medal, now 
given to exhibitors who have already received an Exhibition Gold Medal. 
Garden Certificate. Designed in 1924, and given on vote of the Trustees to 
men, women or firms that have been reported during the current year as 
performing notable work in some phase of horticulture or as having notable 
gardens. 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase is awarded each year by the Trustees at a 
meeting in December for the most outstanding exhibit in any of the shows of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society held during that year. The size of the vase, 
which is a craftsman's piece and handmade, varies somewhat with the value of 
the gold. Although it was given by Mr. Burrage in 1930, the original vase was 
awarded under the name of the "Massachusetts Horticultural Society's Gold 
Cup" to Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Burrage for a tropical garden at the Centennial 
Exhibition in 1929. 

The Presidents Cup is given at the discretion of the President for the most 
meritorious exhibit in the Spring Show. 

27 




George Robert White 
Medal of Honor 




Thomas Roland Medal 



AW 
MASSACHUSETTS 




Jackson Dawson Medal 




Illitl 



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I'm sident's Cup 






28 



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CULTURAL SOCIETY 













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H.H. Hunnewell Medal 





Large Gold Medal 




Antoine Leuthy Gold Medal 



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Gold Medal 
Certificate 



Garden Certificate 




Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 



29 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1962 

The Albert C. Burr age Gold Vase 

Mr. Alexander I. Heimlich, Woburn, for a Hillside Rock Garden, the 
most outstanding exhibit in 1962. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Mr. Henry Francis du Pont, Winterthur, Delaware, for eminent service 
in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Mr. Karl P. Jones, Barrington, Rhode Island, for exceptional skill in horti- 
culture. 

Gold Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mrs. Chester S. Cook, Lexington, for artistry in arranging flowers. 

Dr. and Mrs. William L. Davis, Winchester, for a series of well-planned 
gardens. 

Fitchburg Paper Company, Fitchburg, for a series of well-planted gardens. 

Mr. Brian O. Mulligan, Seattle, Washington, for eminent service to horti- 
culture. 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Vanderbilt, Brookline, for a dignified planting 
about the house. 

Silver Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Brown, Newton, for a skillfully designed intimate 

garden. 
Mrs. Irving W. Fraim, Waltham, for a complete garden extremely well 

planted. 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Harrower, Fitchburg, for a series of beautiful 

gardens. 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip W. Lown, Newton, for an excellent foundation 

planting and a well-kept lawn. 
WVston Nurseries, Inc., Hopkinton, for a display garden. 

Bronze Medals of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Overly, Harvard, for a well-planted garden of 

native and exotic plants. 
Mr. and Mrs. George R. Wallace, Fitchburg, for a formal planting around 

a modem home. 

30 



Medals' and Certificates Awarded in 1962 

Garden Certificates of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mrs. Edgar W. Cottle, Harvard, for a wild garden balanced by a formal 
lawn and large trees of clipped arborvitae and perennials. 

Fitchburg Youth Library, Fitchburg, for a well-kept patio planting in a 
children's library garden. 

Woburn National Bank Branch, Woburn, for a colorful planting about a 
small, one-story branch bank. 

The Albert C. Burr age Porch Prize 

Mr. and Mrs. John Dane Jr., Brookline, for a beautiful garden and terrace. 

The President's Cup 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., Hopkinton, for a naturalistic sand-pond planting, 
the most meritorious exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of the 
Horticultural Society of New York 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for a group of acacias, the most 
beautiful exhibit in the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the 
Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

Mr. Alexander I. Heimlich, Woburn, for an exhibit of special merit which 
stimulated an interest in horticulture in the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal of the 
Philadelphia Flower Show, Inc. 

New England Carnation Growers Association, for a group of carnations, 
an exhibit that deserved additional recognition at the Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

Garden Club of Swampscott, for the most charming garden club exhibit 
in the Spring Show. 

Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

Beacon Hill Garden Club, for the exhibit in the Garden Club Section 
displaying the greatest horticultural excellence at the Spring Show. 

The Antoine Leuthy Prize 

Fishelson, Florist, Boston, for a Roman Square Flower Market, the best 
display of flowering or foliage plants in the Spring Show. 

31 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1962 

Trophy of the 
Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., Hopkinton, for a naturalistic sand-pond planting, 
the best exhibit staged by a Commercial Grower in Massachusetts at 
the Spring Show. 

Bulkley Medal of the Garden Club of America 

Wellesley Garden Club, for their Guatemala Garden at the Spring Show. 

The Beatrix Farrand Silver Bowl 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., Hopkinton, for a naturalistic sand-pond planting, 
the best exhibit of rhododendrons at the Spring Show. 

John Taylor Arms Award 

Mrs. Sam McCullough Jr., Springfield Garden Club, for the blue ribbon 
entry receiving the highest number of points at the Spring Show. 

The Mrs, Edwin Sibley Webster Cup 

Junior League of Boston, for excellence in design at the Spring Show. 

Wonderland Cup 

Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources, for a New England 
Seaside Village, for the largest number of votes from the flower show 
visitors at the Spring Show. 

Best Blooms 

Camellia 'Donkelaari', exhibited by Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut 

Hill. 
Daffodil 'Agathun, exhibited by Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill. 
Hemerocallis 'Neyron Rose', exhibited by The Merrys, Needham. 
Iris 'High Seas', exhibited by Mrs. Preston Corey, Reading. 
Tulip 'Aristocrat', exhibited by Mr. James R. Cass, Hyde Park. 

Gold Medals 

American Begonia Society, Bessie Raymond Buxton Branch, for an in- 
formal begonia garden at the Spring Show. 
Arnold Arboretum, for a collection of dwarf evergreens at the Spring 

Show. 

Associated Fruit Growers of Eastern Massachusetts, for a display of fruits. 
Bartlett Gardens, for a contemporary garden at the Spring Show. 
Bartletl Gardens, for a chrysanthemum garden. 
Blackthorne Gardens, for a collection of lilies. 

32 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1962 

Boston Market Gardeners Association, for a display of vegetables. 
Boston Public School Garden at Woburn, for a display of vegetables and 

flowers. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cameron Bradley, for an exhibit of camellias. 
Butler and Ullman, Inc., for an exhibit of camellias. 
F. I. Carter & Sons, for an educational exhibit of cacti and succulents at 

the Spring Show. 
Cider Hill Greenhouses, for a group of saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 
Cider Hill Greenhouses, for a group of saintpaulias. 
De Vincent Farms, for a chrysanthemum garden. 

Fishelson Florist, for a Roman Square Flower Market at the Spring Show. 
Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, Inc. (Mrs. Hollis L. Gray, 

Chairman), for a group of flower arrangements based on the theme 

"Reflections, Past and Present" at the Spring Show. 
Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, Inc., (Mrs. Robert C. Richards, 

Chairman) based on the theme "Roses Through History." 
Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, Inc., Flower Arrangement 

Section based on the theme "Consider the lilies, how they grow; they 

toil not, neither do they spin." 
Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, Inc., Flower Arrangement 

Section based on the theme "Shibui." 
Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts, Inc., Flower Arrangement 

Section based on the theme "New England Harvest." 
Gardeners' and Florists' Club of Boston, for a pot plant garden at the 

Spring Show. 
Gardner Museum, for a collection of blue primroses at the Spring Show. 
Gardner Museum, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Mrs. Ricardo C. Gonzales, for a display of daffodils. 
Mrs. Ricardo C. Gonzales, for a display of tulips. 

Mr. Alexander I. Heimlich, for a hillside rock garden at the Spring Show. 
Johnson Brothers Greenhouses, Inc., for a rose exhibit at the Spring Show. 
Mr. Karl P. Jones, for a display of roses. 
Mr. Harold W. Knowlton, for a display of iris. 
Mr. William F. Lommerse, for a display of tulips. 
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, for an exhibit of medicinal plants at 

the Spring Show. 
Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources, for a New England 

Seaside Village at the Spring Show. 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Exhibitions Committee, 

(Mrs. John M. Hall, Chairman) for ten small gardens based on the 

theme "Gardens Around the World" at the Spring Show. 
The Merrys, for a display of hemerocallis. 
Montgomery Company, for a rose exhibit at the Spring Show. 

33 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1962 

National Association of Gardeners, Boston Branch, for a Victorian garden 

at the Spring Show. 
National Association of Gardeners, Cape Cod Branch, for a June garden 

at the Spring Show. 
National Association of Gardeners, Newport Rhode Island Branch, for an 

informal garden at the Spring Show. 
New England Carnation Growers Association, for a display of carnations 

at the Spring Show. 
New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, for an exhibit of apples 

and grapes. 
North Shore Horticultural Society, for a formal summer garden at the 

Spring Show. 
Oregon Bulb Farm, for a collection of lilies. 
Peirce Brothers, Inc., for a display of roses. 
Mr. George H. Pride, for a display of bearded iris. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for a group of acacias at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a display of daffodils. 
Wellesley College, Department of Botany, for an exhibit of medicinal 

plants at the Spring Show. 
Weston Nurseries, Inc., for a naturalistic sand-pond planting at the Spring 

Show. 
Weston Nurseries, Inc., for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Silver Medals 

Amateur Horticultural Competition (Mrs. Hugh Hencken, Chairman) for 
a display of horticultural talents at the Spring Show. 

American Iris Society, New England, Region 1, for a display of bearded 
iris. 

Arrowhead Gardens, for a display of chrysanthemums. 

Mr. Walter D. Brownell Jr., for an informal rose garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Mr. James R. Cass, for a display of roses. 

D'Errico-McGlynn Flowers, for a display of chrysanthemums. 

Mr. Leo J. Dutram, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 

Handy Greenhouses, for a group of saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 

Mr. Allen C. Haskell, for a hillside planting of cytisus at the Spring Show. 

Mr. Sidney Hoffman Jr., for a display of chrysanthemums. 

Mr. William F. Lommerse, for a display of lily-flowered tulips. 

I he Merrys, for a display of daffodils. 

The Merrys, for a display of iris. 

Miss Helen C. Moselev,'for an exhibit of foliage and flowering plants at 
the Spring Show. 6 F 

34 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1962 

Norfolk County Agricultural School, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Oregon Bulb Farm, for the best stalk of a named hybrid lily. 

Packard Nursery & Garden Shop, Inc., for an informal backyard garden 

at the Spring Show. 
Pride's, for a display of daffodils. 
Pride's, for a display of hemerocallis. 
Mr. Andrew E. Simoni, for a collection of lilies. 
Norma Simoni, for a collection of lily prints and etchings. 
Mr. Paul R. Steinkamp, for a naturalistic garden at the Spring Show. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for a group of cypripedium. 
Mr. John Thibodeau, for a miniature bulb border at the Spring Show. 
Mr. Marinus Vander Pol, for a hillside planting of cytisus at the Spring 

Show. 

Bronze Medals 

Boston Mycological Club, for a display of mushrooms. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for a planting of rhododendrons and azaleas at 

the Spring Show. 
Izette Clarke, for a display of hemerocallis. 
Copeland School Garden, for a display of flowers and vegetables from 

a school garden. 
The Garden Shed, for a naturalistic garden. 
Jamaica Plain High School, for a naturalistic woodland at the Spring 

Show. 
The Junior League of Boston, Inc., for a display of flowers and vegetables 

grown at the Embankment Garden. 
Junior's Plant Shop, for a display of dried material. 
Mildred Mowll, for a display of hemerocallis. 
Norfolk County Agricultural School, for an informal garden at the 

Spring Show. 
Pine Gardens, for a garden in the woods at the Spring Show. 
Mr. John Thibodeau, for a display of spring-flowering bulbs. 

Awards of Merit 

Apple Variety 'Niagara', exhibited by the New York State Agricultural 

Experiment Station. 
Apple Variety 'Wayne', exhibited by the New York State Agricultural 

Experiment Station. 
Clematis 'Edith Hulley', exhibited by Albert A. Hulley at the Spring 

Show. 
Clematis 'Ruth Hulley', exhibited by Albert A. Hully at the Spring 

Show. 
Carnation 'White Sidney Littlefield', exhibited by the New England 

Carnation Growers Association at the Spring Show. 

35 



Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1962 

Votes of Commendation 

Hybrid Tea Rose 'Best Wishes', exhibited by Arnold Fisher Company 

at the Spring Show. 
Hybrid Tea Rose 'Red American Beauty', exhibited by Johnson Brothers 

Greenhouses at the Spring Show. 
Carnation 'Peace River/ exhibited by the New England Carnation 

Growers Association at the Spring Show. 
Carnation seedling 'Marlboro', exhibited by the New England Carnation 

Growers Asociation at the Spring Show. 

Cultural Certificates 

Mr. Leo J. Dutram, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. Ricardo C. Gonzales, for a display of tulips. 

Mrs. Helmi Johnson, for a display of bearded iris. 

Mrs. Edna Roberts, for a group of saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 

Mr. John Sullivan, for two plants Cymhidium schlegeli 'Mrs. Mary 

House.' 
Mr. John Sullivan, for an exhibit of Primula obconica at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. Edith S. Webster, for a group of winter-flowering begonias. 

Votes of Thanks 

Dr. Samuel E. Emsweller, for a collection of prints. 

Mrs. Lawrence Morrison, for a hardy single pink chrysanthemum. 

Mrs. Olaf Nelson, for rose 'Talisman'. 

First Class Certificate 

Carnation 'Salmonaise', exhibited by the New England Carnation Grow- 
ers Association at the Spring Show. 




Mrs. John M. Hall, left, 
presenting the Society's 
Gold Medal to Dr. Wil- 
liam L. Davis for his 
well-planned, mature 
gardens in the shade 



36 



Report of the Treasurer 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1962 



The Society experienced a further loss from Operations during 
the Calendar Year 1962. This loss amounted to $36,953.79 com- 
pared with a red ink figure of $58,502.64 in 1961. It should be 
remembered, the outcome for any year of the Society hinges on 
two important segments of our Annual Operations: namely, the 
Annual Spring Show and the proceeds of our magazine, Horti- 
culture. The 1962 Spring Show resulted in a profit of $26,330.03 
compared with a 1961 actual loss of $17,711.13. Horticulture 
showed a loss of $28,004.86 in 1962 against $33,191.38 in 1961. It 
is encouraging to note, subscriptions to Horticulture are on the 
increase — which should indicate hope for the year 1963. 

During 1962 the Society was fortunate to receive $4,500.00 from 
bequests. 

The Library Committee agreed to accept a lower budget of 
expenses during 1962; and I am happy to report that Department 
lived within its funds. 

The Trustees, the Executive Committee and our hard-working 
staff are unanimous in reducing costs wherever possible. We be- 
lieve the answer to our problem lies in strengthening the member- 
ship roster and increasing the circulation of Horticulture. 



Respectfully Submitted, 



Edward Dane 
Treasurer 



37 



Statement of Financial Condition at December ai, 1962 

ASSETS 

Cash in Banks and On Hand $ 24,850.10 

Accounts Receivable — Horticulture 16,372.91 

Accounts Receivable $ 20,872.91 

Deduct: Allowance for losses in coll 4,500.00 

$ 16,372.91 

Accounts Receivable Other 547.54 

Investments at Book Value 717,124.20 

Eleanor Tudor Trust 7,942.50 

Capital Assets 606,195.92 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and Additions to Building . . 61,050.82 

Library 46,580.47 

$606,195.92 

Deferred Charges 26,741.01 

Spring Show, 1963 $ 2,409.77 

Prepaid Insurance and Expense 13,393.79 

Inventory of Books, Binders, etc 10,937.45 



$ 26,741.01 



$ 66,554.62 



$ 8,789.37 



Principal $240,539.71 

pended Income 7,923.44 



248,463.15 



$1,399,774.18 



LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL FUNDS 

Liabilities $ 66,554.62 

Accounts Payable $ 57,304.67 

Taxes Withheld 3,400.53 

Accrued Commissions — Horticulture .... 3,721.22 

Social Security Taxes Accrued 281.39 

Credit Balances Accounts Receivable 1,531.81 

Deposits on Rentals 315.00 



Eleanor Tudor Trust Fund 8 789.37 

Principal $ 7,992.50 

Unexpended Income 796.87 



Deferred Income — Library 4 103 21 

S, V ,(Irv Jf™* 874/705:60 

Special Uses: 



38 



General Uses: 

Principal 626,242.45 

874,705.60 

Deferred Income — 1963 Spring Show 3,937.50 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 144,806.69 

Deficit . (267,647.51) 

1,399,774.18 



Statement of Income and Expenditures 

INCOME 

1962 1961 

Income from Investments $ 83,342.97 $ 78,045.00 

Membership Fees (after member's subscrip- 
tion to Horticulture) 34,549.03 35,620.94 

Rentals 13,066.50 13,583.42 

Spring Show 56,918.50 17,711.13 

Autumn Show (4,375.51) (5,020.74) 

Horticulture (28,004.86) (33,191.38) 

Other Receipts ..... 953.75 1,357.50 

$156,450.38 $108,105.87 

EXPENDITURES 

Building Expenses $ 45,177.70 $ 40,017.78 

Library Expenses 16,777.16 15,083.53 

Office and General Expenses 82,105.78 76,953.96 

Awards, Lectures, Medals and Certificates: 

Lectures paid from General Funds 1,165.23 1,191.97 

Prizes, Medals and Certificates paid from 

General Funds 3,372.62 2,868.55 

Prizes, Medals and Certificates paid from 

Spring Show 30,588.47 17,711.13 

Medals, Lectures, etc. paid from Restricted 

Funds 1,535.91 2,050.92 

Awards at Shows paid from Restricted 

Funds 3,992.82 13,409.60 

Miscellaneous Exhibition Expenses 6,042.33 5,230.98 

$190,758.02 $174,518.42 

Net Profit (or Loss)— All Funds $(34,307.64) $(66,412.55) 

Elimination of Expenses Included Above Paid 

from Income of Restricted Funds 7,107.90 $ 17,574.56 

$(27,199.74) $(48,837.99) 
Elimination of Income Included Above Allo- 
cated to Restricted Funds $ 9,754.05 $ 9,664.65 



Net Profit (or Loss)— General Funds $(36,953.79) $(58,502.64 

39 



Report of the Committee on Library 

The Library Committee and the Staff are working constantly to find 
good ways of reaching our non-resident members. Last summer we gave 
this special attention and can report a small but steady increase in patron- 
age beginning last July. 

The loan of books, though most easily reported in figures, is only one 
of the activities of our department. Many hours are spent searching for 
information for our readers, writing letters and choosing and preparing 
new books for the shelves. We are as accessible to distant members by 
mail and telephone as we are to local residents, and our well-informed 
professional staff is ready to help. To bring the right book to the right 
person at the right time is our reason for being in business. So we say 
to all our members. "This fine library is yours. The Staff is here to serve 
and help you, and your requests and inquiries are always welcome/' 

Of course a borrower must know what books are on hand. A revision 
of our selected catalog, "Books for Gardeners," is now at the printer's, 
and when it is ready a notice will be sent to every member. In addition, 
a list of books newly added will be printed, as usual, in the Yearbook. We 
know that readers watch for this annual list, for as soon as it is sent out, 
requests for the books begin to come to us. 

Additions to the book collection come from several sources — pur- 
chases, binding of magazines, personal gifts and books sent for review. 
For the past two years funds for binding have been limited, but we look 
forward to catching up before long. 

Last year the G. K. Hall Company of Boston asked and received per- 
mission to reproduce our card catalog in book form, for sale by them 
to other libraries and research institutions. We will receive royalty pay- 
ments. This spring the catalog was issued in three folio volumes, con- 
taining 44,000 entries. This is a great honor to us and to our librarian, for 
Hall specializes in the printing of a carefully chosen list of important 
subject catalogs and bibliographies. We are in the distinguished company 
of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, the United States Depart- 
menl of Agriculture, the Smithsonian Institution, the Yale School of 
Forestry, and about fifty others of equal standing. Already, within two 
months of its issue, we are receiving letters from other research libraries 
regarding important books listed in the catalog. 

You have heard from Mr. Wolcott that Miss Manks is retiring this 
year. I would like to say that for the last ten years I have been Chairman 

40 




At the formal dedication of the Texas Garden Club's Library, Mr. Howard 
Donovan presented Mrs. Elmer Campbell, Mrs. C. B. Kilpatrick and Mrs. 
Robert Denny, left to right, the Society's Award of Merit for their efforts in 
building a horticultural library. Money for the project was raised through the 
sales of subscriptions to HORTICULTURE 



Report of the Committee on Library 



of the Library Committee and it has been lots of fun to work with her. 
Fun is not usually associated with a Library. Our new Librarian is Mrs. 
Crossman who for five years was Branch Librarian of the Thomas Crane 
Public Library in Quincy and in addition wrote a garden page for the 
Quincy paper. She is also a gardener herself and is a most welcome 
addition to our Staff. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Albert C. Burr age, Chairman 
Committee on Library 



41 




Miss Dorothy S. Manks, who will retire in August, showing some of the rare 
herbals added to the treasure collection during her thirty years as librarian 



Books Added to the Library 



May 2, 1962-May 1,1963 



Gardening 

Bush-Brown, Louise. Young America's garden book. New York, 1962 

Ilalliday, Dean. Garden-graphs. New York, 1962 

Kraft, Ken. Garden to order (history of the Burpee Company). Gar- 
den City, N.Y., 1963 

New York Times. The New York Times garden book, edited by Joan 
Lee Faust. N.Y., 1962 



42 



Books Added to the Library 

Ohio association of garden clubs, Inc. Gardening manual. Urbana, 

Ohio, 1962 
Wyman, Donald. The Saturday morning gardener, a guide to easy 

maintenance. N.Y., 1962 
Youngman, Wilbur H. The Washington Star garden book, the most 

complete guide for Maryland, Washington and Virginia area gardeners. 

Washington, D.C., 1960 

Auxiliary Sciences 

Carter, Walter. Insects in relation to plant disease. N.Y., 1962 
Couch, Houston B. Diseases of turf grasses. New York, 1962 
Crafts, Alden S. The chemistry and mode of action of herbicides. 
N.Y. and London, 1961 

Forbes, Allan W. Our garden friends the bugs, who they are and how 
they help us. N.Y., 1962 

Metcalf, C. L. Destructive and useful insects, their habits and control, 
by C. L. Metcalf and W. P. Flint; 4th ed. rev. New York, 1962 

Ortloff, H. S. A book about soils for the home gardener, by H. S. 
Ortloff and H. B. Raymore, N.Y., 1962 

Robbins, W. W. Weed control, a textbook and manual, by A. S. Crafts 
and W. W. Robbins; 3rd ed. N.Y., 1962 

Sharvelle, Eric G. The nature and uses of modern fungicides. Min- 
neapolis, Minn., 1961 

Shurtleff, M. C. How to control plant diseases in home and garden. 
Ames, Iowa, 1962 

Smith, Floyd F. Controlling insects on flowers. Washington, D.C., 

United States Dept. of Agriculture, 1962 
Treasury of organic gardening ideas. Emmaus, Pa., 1962 

Gardening With Ornamental Plants 

Graf, Alfred Byrd. Exotica 3 . . . with guide to care of plants indoors. 
Rutherford, N.J., 1963 

Martin, J. S. The home owner's tree book. New York, 1962 

Strohm, John, ed. The golden guide to flowers. New York, 1962 

Sunset magazine. How to grow and use bulbs. Menlo Park, Calif., 
1962 

Synge, P. M. The complete guide to bulbs. New York, 1962 (first 

published in England). 
Taylor, Kathryn S. Handbook of wild flower cultivation, by K. S. 

Taylor and Stephen F. Hamblin. New York, 1963 

43 



Books Added to the Library 

Monographs 

American camellia society. American camellia yearbook, 1962/63. 

Gainesville, Fla., 1962 
American fuchsia society. The third fuchsia book. San Francisco, 

Calif., 1962 
American iris society. Iris check list of registered cultivar names, 1950- 

1959, ed. by Harold W. Knowlton. St. Louis, Mo., 1962 
Blowers, J. W. Orchids. New York and London, 1962 
Bois, Eric. Roses, by Eric Bois and Anne-Marie Trechslin. New York 

and London, 1962 

Coats, Peter. Roses, pleasures and treasures. N.Y., 1962 

Edland, Henry. Roses in color. New York, 1962 

Fogg, H. G. W. Lilies and their cultivation. N.Y., 1961 

Genders, Roy. The paeony. London, 1961 

Huxley, A. J. Cacti and succulents. London, 1960 

Milton, John. Rose growing simplified. New York, 1962 

Noble, Mary. You can grow camellias, by Mary Noble and Blanche 
Graham. New York, 1962 

Park, Bertram. The world of roses. New York, 1962 
Parrett, R. C. Delphiniums. Harmondsworth, Middlesex, England 
and Baltimore, Md., 1961 

Royal horticultural society. Classified list and international register of 
daffodil names. London, 1961 

Royal horticultural society. Daffodil and tulip year book, 1963. Lon- 
don 

Royal horticultural society. Lily year book, 1962. London 
Sander, David. Sander's one-table list of orchid hybrids, 1946-1960. 
Selsfield, Sussex, Eng., 1961. 2 vols. 

Sunset magazine. How to grow and use camellias; 2d ed. Menlo 
Park, Calif., 1962 

Threlkeld, J. L. The camellia book. Princeton, N.J., 1962 
Wister, J. C, ed. The peonies. Washington, D.C., 1962 
Woolman, John. Chrysanthemums for garden and exhibition; rev. ed. 
London, Eng. and Hollywood-by-the-Sea, Fla., 1961 

Greenhouse and House Plants 

Jones, M. E. House plants. Harmondsworth, Middlesex, Eng. and 
Baltimore, Md., 1962 

McDonald, Elvin. Miniature plants for home and greenhouse. Prince- 
ton, N.J., 1962 

44 



Books Added to the Library 

Richards, Gomer. Month by month in the greenhouse. New York, 
1962 

Rochford, Thomas. The Rochford book of houseplants, by Thomas 
Rochford and Richard Gorer. New York, 1961 

Fruits, Vegetables and Herbs 

Bush, Raymond. Tree fruit growing; 2d ed. rev. Harmondsworth, 
Middlesex, Eng. and Baltimore, Md., 1962 

Childers, N. F. Modern fruit science; 2d ed. New Bruswick, N.J., 
1961 

Clair, Colin. Of herbs and spices. London, 1961 

Farwell, Mrs. A. D. (Edith Foster). My garden gate is on the latch: 
the story of my garden. Lake Forest, 111., 1962 

Hughes, Cledwyn. Making an orchard, for home fruit growers. (Eng- 
land) New York, 1962 

Zielinski, Q. B. Modern systematic pomology. Dubuque, Iowa, 1955 

Nature Study 

Hay, John. A sense of nature, by John Hay and Arline Strong. New 
York, 1962 

Hillcourt, William. Field book of nature activities and conservation. 
New York, 1961 

Murie, Adolf. A naturalist in Alaska. Garden City, N.Y., 1963 

Conservation 

Brooklyn botanic garden. Conservation for every man. Brooklyn, N.Y., 
1962 

Carson, Rachel. Silent spring. Boston, 1962 

Iowa conservation education council. Conservation source book. Ames, 
Iowa, 1962 

Gardens and Garden Design 

Button, J. P. The flower world of Williamsburg (Williamsburg, Va., 
Colonial Williamsburg). New York, 1962 

Fox, Mrs. II. M. Andre Le Notre, Garden architect to kings. London, 
1962 

Hadfield, Miles. Gardens, pleasures and treasures (history of land- 
scape architecture). New York, 1962 

Jellicoe, G. A. Studies in landscape design. London, 1960 

45 



Books Added to the Library 

Lynch, Kevin. The image of the city. Cambridge, Mass., 1960 

Page, Russell. The education of a gardener. N.Y., 1962 

Schuler, Stanley. Outdoor lighting for your home. Princeton, N.J., 

1962' 
Tono, Takuma. A secret of Japanese gardens, ed. by Kensuke Chokki. 

Tokyo, 1958 
Wilber, D. N. Persian gardens and garden pavilions. Rutland, Ver- 
mont, 1962 

Botany 

Anderson, Kling L. Common names of a selected list of plants. Man- 
hattan, Kansas, 1961 
Clausen, J. C. Experimental studies on the nature of species. Wash- 
ington, D.C., 1958 
Comar, C. L. Radioisotopes in biology and agriculture. N.Y., 1955 
Elliot, John H. Teach yourself botany. New York, 1961 
Galston, Arthur W. The life of the green plant. Englewood Cliffs, 

N.J., 1961 
Greulach, Victor and Adams, J. Edison. Plants, an introduction to 

modern botany. N.Y., 1962 
Hale, Mason E., Jr. Lichen handbook. Washington, D.C., 1961 
Herber, Lewis. Our synthetic environment (an evaluation). N.Y., 1962 

Kleijn, H. Mushrooms and other fungi, their form and colour. N.Y., 
1962 

Lehner, Ernest. Folklore and odysseys of food and medicinal plants. 
N.Y., 1962 

Loeve, Askell and Doris Loeve. Chromosome numbers of central and 

northwest European plant species. Stockholm, 1961 
McKenny, Margaret. The savory wild mushroom. Seattle, 1962 
Marcus, Rebecca B. Science in the garden. N.Y., 1961 
Meyer, Joseph E. The herbalist. Chicago, 1960 

Floras 

• lampbell, Carlos C. and others. Great Smoky Mountains wild flowers. 
Knoxville, Term., 1962 

Cowlard, C. M. Wild flowers of the Italian Riviera. Codicote, Erie., 
L956 

Dean, Blanche Evans. Trees and shrubs in the heart of Dixie. Bir- 
mingham, Ala.. 196] 

46 



Books Added to the Library 

Grimm, William Carey. The book of trees; 2nd ed. Harrisburg, Pa., 

1962 
Guillet, Alma C. Make friends of trees and shrubs. N.Y., 1962 
Hamer, A. Handel. Wild flowers of the Cape (Good Hope). Cape 

Town, 1926 
Hargreaves, Dorothy. Tropical blossoms. Portland, Ore., 1960 
Hylander, Clarence J. Flowers of field and forest. N.Y., 1962 
Kurz, Herman, and Godfrey, Robert K. Trees of northern Florida. 

Gainesville, Fla., 1962 
Lind, E. M. Some common flowering plants of Uganda. London, 

1962 

Laing, Robert Malcolm. Plants of New Zealand. Christchurch, 1957 
Munz, Philip A. California desert flowers. Berkeley, Calif., 1962 

Fine Arts 

Brown, Gregory. How to draw trees; 9th impression. London, 1949 

Neutra, Richard. Survival through design. Fairlawn, N.J., 1954 

Tucker, Shirley C. and Weber, Claude. Flowers and botanical subjects 
on stamps. Milwaukee, 1960 

Essays 

Barraclough, Daphne. A flower-lover's miscellany. N.Y., 1962 

Gillespie, Janet. The joy of a small garden. N.Y., 1963 

Shewell-Cooper, W. E. Plants and fruits of the Bible. London, 1962 

Tergit, Gabriele. Flowers through the ages. Phila., 1961 

Thoreau, Henry David. The thoughts of Thoreau, compiled by Edwin 
Way Teale. N.Y., 1962 

Woods, Charles Coke. In the beauty of meadow and mountain. Cin- 
cinnati, 1913 

Flower Arrangement 

Amer, Jean B. Flower arrangements for special occasions. Nashville, 
1962 

Benz, Morris. Flowers: creative designs, geometric analysis (new ed. 
rev.). Houston, Texas, 1962 

Boycan, James E. The picture book of foliage arrangements, and how 

to arrange them. Sharon, Pa., 1962 
Booke, Ruth Voorhees. Pressed flower pictures. Princeton, N.J., 1962 

Carren, Seymour. Manual for floral decoration in the home. N.Y., 
1962 

47 



Books Added to the Library 

Clements, Julia. Fun without flowers. N.Y., 1962 

Goldson, Rae L. Contemporary flower arrangement; rev. & enl. ed. 

N.Y., 1962 
Goldson, Rae L. Workbook of containers, stands and mechanics. N.Y., 

1962 
Harold, Margaret, and Bob Thomas. Best of show in flower arrange- 
ments. Nashville, 1961 
Hemingway, Beth. A second treasury of Christmas decoration. N.Y., 

1961 
Kroh, Patricia. Japanese flower arrangement notebook. Garden City, 

N.Y., 1962 
Ohchi, Hiroshi. Ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arrangement; 2nd 

ed. Teufen, 1961 
Peterson, Caroline E. The art of flower arrangement in Hawaii. 

Honolulu, 1962 
Shinno, Tat. Flower arranging by Tat. Los Angeles, 1961 
Sprackling, Helen. The new setting your table, its art, etiquette and 

service. N.Y., 1960 

Thomas, Bob. The new modern in flower arrangements. Nashville, 
1962 

Vogue in flowers: wedding designs; 11th ed. Chicago, 1962 

W hitlock, Sarah and Martha Rankin. New techniques with dried flow- 
ers. N.Y., 1962 

Wilson, Adelaide B. Color in flower arrangements. N.Y., 1954 

Wilson, Helen Van Pelt. Flower arrangements, designs for today. 
Princeton, N.J., 1962 



Gifts to the Library 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with thanks gifts 
to the Library from the following donors: 

Amks, Oakes I. 

American rose annual. 1939, 1941-1958. 19 vols. 

American rose society. What every rose grower should know 

Bailey, L. H. Manual of gardening 

Forbes, W. T. M. The lepidoptera of New York and neighboring 

states 
Garden guide, 6th ed. 

48 



Gifts to the Library 

Gifford, J. Practical forestry 

Hottes, A. C. 1001 garden questions answered 

Huntington, A. P. Studies of trees in winter 

Kains, M. G. Modern guide to successful gardening 

Keeler, H. L. Our native trees 

Newhall, C. S. The shrubs of northeastern America, 1890, 1900 

Newhall. C. S. The vines of northeastern America 

Ortloff, H. S. and Raymore, H. B. Color and succession of bloom in 

the flower border 
Putz, A. The garden notebook 
Schrepfer, R. A. Hardy evergreens 
Sears, F. C. Productive orcharding 
Seymour, A. L. D., ed. Favorite flowers in color 
Tiedjens, V. A. The vegetable encyclopedia and gardener's guide 
Wilder, L. B. Colour in my garden 
Wilder, L. B. My garden 
Wilkinson, A. E. The apple 
Wilkinson, A. E. The flower encyclopedia and gardener's guide 

Alden, John E. 

De Chimay, J. Les jar dins a travers le monde 
Hamer, A. H. Wild flowers of the Cape, a floral year 

Bartholomew, Mrs. John A. 

Edgarton, S. C, ed. Fables of flora 

Cook, Mildred E. 

Temple, V. Flowers and butterflies 

Eaton, Mrs. Gertrude Sturgis 

Ellwanger, G H. The garden's story 

Grullemans, J. J. 

Pittier, H. Manual de las plantas usuales de Venezuela 

HACKETT, MRS. JOSEPH A. in memory of Mrs. Gordon Collier 

Taylor, Kathryn S. Handbook of wild flower cultivation 

HACKETT, MRS. JOSEPH A. in memory of Wilfrid Wheeler 

Roberts, M. W. Public gardens and arboretums of the United States 

Synge, P. W. A complete guide to bulbs 

Taylor, Kathryn S. Handbook of wild flower cultivation 

Lothrop, C. H. 

Sutton and sons. The culture of vegetables and flowers from seeds 
and roots 

49 



Gifts to the Library 

Lowell, Mrs. Ralph 

Photograph: Members of the Massachusetts Society for Promoting 
Agriculture, 1920 

Mattoon, H. Gleason 

Bailey, L. H. The garden lover 

Ba ley, L. H. The pruning book 

Brown, G. How to draw trees 

Felt, E. P. Our shade trees. 1938 and 2nd ed. 1942 

Felt, E. P. Pruning trees and shrubs 

Felt, E. P. Shelter trees in war and peace 

Fernald, H. T. Applied entomology, 4th ed. 1942 

Gnadinger, C. B. Pyrethrum flowers 

Greeves-Carpenter, C. G. The care of ornamental trees 

Herber, L. Our synthetic environment 

Kraft, K. Garden to order 

Powell, G H. Cooperation in agriculture 

Wilson, A. Insects and their control 

Woods, C. C. In the beauty of meadow and mountain 

Wright, W. J. Greenhouses, their construction and equipment 

Mount Auburn Cemetery 

Allen, R. C. Roses for every garden 

American rose annual. 1935-1938 

Bailey, L. H. The garden of larkspurs 

Biles, R. E. The complete book of garden magic 

Cumming, A. Hardy chrysanthemums 

Herrick, G. W. Insect enemies of shade trees 

Lyon, T. L. and Buckman, H. O. The nature and properties of soils 

McFarland, J. H. Roses of the world in color 

Ncwhall, S. C. The shrubs of northeastern America 

Newhall, S. C. The trees of northeastern America 

Robinson, F. B. Planting design 

Rohde, E. S. The story of the garden 

Van Slyke, L. L. Fertilizers and crop production 

Westcott, C. The plant doctor 

Wilder, L. B. Adventures with hardy bulbs 

Wilson, H. V. P. Perennials preferred 

Muller, E. 

Simonds, A. J. All about garden frames 

Slade, D. D. The evolution of horticulture in New England 

Nehrling, Arno H. 

Degener, O. Flora Hawaiiensis, book 5 

50 



Gifts to the Library 

New England Women's Club 

Braithwaite, R. The sphagnaceae or peat mosses of Europe and 
North America 

Britton, N. L. An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Can- 
ada and the British possessions, vols. 1 and 2 

Emerson, G. B. A report on the trees and shrubs growing naturally 
in the forests of Massachusetts 

Gray A. Manual of botany of the northern United States 

Knuth, P. Handbook of flower pollination 

Lesquereux, L. Manual of the mosses of North America 

Sach, J. Text-book of botany 

Small, J. K. Flora of the southeastern United States 

Torrey, J. Flora of North America 

Wilson, E. H. Aristocrats of the garden 

Wolle, F. Fresh water algae of the United States 

SCHLICK, L. 

Vilmorin-Andrieux et Cie. Album de cliches, electrotypes, kupfer- 
niederschlaege 

Scofield, C. Edward 

Biltmore Nursery. Biltmore roses 
Elliot Nursery Co. Elliot's planting book 
Mueller, A. Portraits of dogwoods 
Schling, M. Stories of flowers 

Shattuck, Dr. George C. 

Collette. For a flower album 

Taloumis, George 

Kraft, K. Garden to order 

Wheeler, Mrs. Wilfrid, in memory of Mr. wheder 

Hedrick, U. P. The grapes of New York 
Hedrick, U. P. The peaches of New York 
Hedrick, U. P. The pears of New York 
Hedrick, U. P. The plums of New York 
Hedrick, U. P. The small fruits of New York 

Wilson, Mrs. A. C. 

One hundred and eighteen volumes from her gardening library 



51 



Benevolent Fraternity Fruit and Flower Mission 

This is the ninety-third Annual Report of Fruit and Flower Mission. 
Time has changed many things since the founding of the Mission in 1869 
but this unique non-sectarian service of human kindness to the elderly, 
the lonely and the less fortunate, is still carried on in the tradition of 
"sharing to brighten the lives of others" as the founder, Miss Helen 
Tinkham, intended. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society gave the Mission the first oppor- 
tunity for expansion in 1925 when the Trustees permitted us to use the 
office on the lower floor. This gave us an opportunity to receive flowers, 
fruits and vegetables remaining after the shows in Horticultural Hall. 
Hundreds of elderly people enjoy this beauty and food every year. 

Thirteen communities are active in the summer flower distribution. 
Six distributing centers in the crowded sections of the city receive flowers 
each week. Nine towns are delivering by private car, two send by 
express and the remainder by railroad. This latter transportation has not 
been satisfactory — flowers do not keep fresh. Vegetables travel better 
and are welcome at any time. 

A question has been brought up as to the advisability of sending checks 
instead of flowers. My only answer has been, "while checks are always 
needed the personal touch which has made such a deep impression on 
the recipients would be lost." If flowers are at all possible, even in small 
amounts, they bring the message of thought to lonely people who live 
where demolition is constantly in their view, so natural beauty is a 
double treat to their weary eyes. 

The following figures show the flower contributions from the towns — 
hampers, cartons and baskets, — 260; pails, 479; cans, 290; totaling 1029. 
The town of Harvard headed the list in flower contributions. They also 
supplied three hundred seventy-five jars of homemade jelly for our 
nursing home trays during the holidays. Duxbury Garden Club closed 
the summer season by sending forty baskets filled with food. Lincoln 
Garden Club sent thirty well-filled baskets in October. 

The Holiday work starts in October and continues through the Christ- 
inas season. Volunteers spend many hours each week preparing baskets 
and wrapping food. The problem of volunteers is always present, 
especiall) since so many who have helped are now gainfully employed or 
have moved too far away. The ones on our list are dedicated friends of 
the Mission and are our most valuable assets. Three come from a distance 
requiring three bus changes and they come twice to three or four times a 
week. The) are the life line which has kept up the interest and support 
01 this Mission over such a long span of years. 

It is interesting to note the change in the number of recipients who are 
"i Nursing Homes in comparison to ten years ago. This number now is 
almosl equal to those living in small apartments. 

W e delivered seven hundred sixty-two baskets and trays during the 

52 



three holidays, also gifts at Christmas and a Begonia plant at Easter. 
Garden Clubs, Church Groups, Women's Clubs and individual contribu- 
tors also remembered our needs during the Holidays. Hundreds of 
magazines and scrapbooks have been sent to Nursing Homes, Children's 
Homes and to the Mentally Retarded children. 

Fruit and Flower Mission is grateful to the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society for many courtesies extended at Horticultural Hall by all con- 
nected with the Society. We acknowledge deep appreciation to all who 
took part in this rewarding work during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Esther L. Camfield 
Executive Secretary 




Enthusiastic student gardeners in the Outdoor Practical Gardening Course in 
Dover, at the home of the instructor Mrs. Lucien B. Taylor (in bandanna), 
learning how to transplant seedlings. 



53 



Honorary Memrers 

1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Dr. William A. Dayton, Washington, D. C. 

1942 Joseph B. Gable, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania 

1942 Robert Moses, New York, New York . 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Geobge H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Ipswich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePltris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Dr. Henry T. Skinner, Washington, D. C. 

1944 Richardson Wright, Chatham, Massachusetts 

1945 Albebt Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1946 Walteb B. Clarke, San Jose, California 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Thomas H. Everett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 
1947 James J. Hurley, Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 

1947 Isabella Preston, Georgetown, Ontario, Canada 

1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 

1948 Ebic Waltheb, San Francisco, California 

1949 Mobbis Cabteb, Boston, Massachusetts 
1949 Henby Kohankie, Painesville, Ohio 

1949 A. Kenneth Simpson, Tarrytown, New York 

1949 Db. Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan 

1950 Montague Fbee, Hyde Park, New York 

1 950 Db. Wilson Popenoe, Antigua, Guatemala 

1950 Geobge L. Slate, Geneva, New York 

1951 JanDeGbaafe, Gresham, Oregon 

1951 Thomas C. Desmond, Newburgh, New York 

1951 Db. Samuel L. Emswelleb, Beltsville, Maryland 

1951 William Hebtbich, San Marino, California 

1951 Mrs. G. Kennabd Wakefield, Milton, Massachusetts 

1952 Dr. Donald F. Jones, New Haven, Connecticut 
1952 Dr. Walter E. Lammebts, Livermore, California 

1952 Prof. Alex Laurie, Eustis, Florida 

Sir William Wright Smith, Edinburgh, Scotland 

1 953 Arie F. Den Boer, Des Moines, Iowa 
1 953 Fred Edmunds, Sherwood, Oregon 

J 953 Dr. Victor A. Tiedjens, Marion, Ohio 
N RN( >ld Davis, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 
Joseph J. Lane, Mamaroneck, New York 

54 



Honorary Members 

1955 Miss Sarah Brassill, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

1955 Paul Vossberg, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1955 Dr. Richard P. White, Washington, D. C. 

1955 Mrs. Irving C. Wright, Milton, Massachusetts 

1956 Eugene S. Boerner, Newark, New York 
1956 Frank Reinelt, Capitola, California 

1956 Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Boston, Massachusetts 

1957 W. Ray Hastings, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
1957 Dr. R. E. Kleinsorge, Silverton, Oregon 
1957 Jacques Legendre, Wachapreague, Virginia 

1957 Charles H. Perkins, Newark, New York 

1958 J. J. Grullemans, Mentor, Ohio 

1958 Mrs. Roy Arthur Hunt, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

1958 Mrs. Lucien B. Taylor, Dover, Massachusetts 

1959 Prof. L. C. Chadwick, Columbus, Ohio 

1959 Mrs. Susan Delano McKelvey, Boston, Massachusetts 

1959 Arno H. Nehrling, Needham Heights, Massachusetts 

1959 Conrad L. Wirth, Washington, D. C. 

1960 Dr. H. Harold Hume, Gainesville, Florida 
1960 George W. Peyton, Rapidan, Virginia 
1960 Dr. Karl Sax, Media, Pennsylvania 

1960 Henry Teuscher, Montreal, Canada 

1960 Henry G. Wendler, Newton Center, Massachusetts 

1961 Dr. Clement Gray Bowers, Maine, New York 
1961 Theodore Payne, Los Angeles, California 

1961 Frederick Frye Rockwell, Orleans, Massachusetts 
1931 Dr. Russell J. Seibert, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania 

1962 Dr. Raymond C. Allen, Mansfield, Ohio 
1962 Alfred Byrd Graf, Rutherford, New Jersey 
1962 Herbert C. Swim, Chino, California 

1962 John Caspar Wister, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania 

1963 Mrs. Chester S. Cook, Lexington, Massachusetts 
1963 Mr. Henry Francis du Pont, Winterthur, Delaware 
1963 Mr. Karl P. Jones, Barrington, Rhode Island 

1963 Mr. Brian O. Mulligan, Seattle, Washington 

Necrology 

A list of the members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, whose 
deaths were reported to the Membership Secretary during the year. 

Mrs. Stephen P. Alden Mrs. Conrelia Benedict 

Mrs. William Almy Jr. Mr. Alrert J. Bettey 

Mr. Orson Balch Mr. Fred T. Boyd 

Mrs. E. Atkins Baldwin Mr. William K. Bruckhauser 

Mr. Judson S. Battelle Mrs. Ralph E. Bullard 

55 



Necrology 



Mrs. Edward Butler 
Mrs. Walter M. Cabot Sr. 
Miss Helen F. Carr 
Mr. George H. Carter 
Mrs. George A. Clapp 
Mrs. William H. Coburn 
Mrs. Thomas B. Collins 
Mrs. John J. Colony 
Miss Elizabeth W. Col well 
Mrs. John Cooke 
Mrs. John Gardner Coolidge 
Mrs. P. R. Crosby 
Mrs. Robert Cushman 
Mr. Charles W. Davol 
Mrs. Mary E. Day 
Miss Bertha Dean 
Mr. Aldrich Durant 
Miss Ellyn L. Edwards 
Mr. John Ellis 
Mr. Frederick R. Evans 
Mr. Eugene N. Fischer 
Miss Etta P. Flagg 
Mrs. I. M. Frothingham 
Miss Mary T. Gallagher 
Mrs. Gordon Gardiner 
Mrs. Francis Gardner 
Mrs. Chester W. Gooch 
Mr. A. Z. Goodfellow 
Mr. George C. Greener 
Mrs. Gardner W. Hall 
Mr. Arthur W. Hartt 
Mrs. Harry T. Hayward 
Mr. Hamilton Heard 
Mrs. Russell G. Hemenway 
Mrs. Arthur D. Hill 
Miss II \hkiet F. Holmes 
Mm. Franklin P. Horton 
Mrs. Leslie Hough 

Miss \ ERONICAT. HyLAND 

Mr. Malcolm F. Jones 
Mr. Paul S. Jon 

Mr. Milton- E. Kelley 
M \\- S K 



[RSHEN 



Mrs. A. 



Mrs. Charles A. Krahmer 
Mrs. Frances G. Lee 
Mr. Charles Lovell 
Mrs. Franklin P. Lowry 
Mr. Stephen B. Luce 
Mr. Ronald T. Lyman 
Mr. Eldon MacLeod 
Mrs. John C. Makepeace 
Miss Mary A. McIlwain 
Mrs. Sherburn M. Merrill 
Mr. Charles Mitchell 
Miss Lilian Mitchell 
Mr. J. Edgar Morrison 
Mr. Ben: Perley Poore Moseley 
Mrs. Jerome B. Norton 
Mrs. Arthur H. Parker 
Mrs. Betsy Peabody 
Miss Alma C. Pelton 
Mrs. John F. Perkins 
Mrs. Henry D. Prescott 
Mrs. Rodney Procter 
Mrs. Harold S. Randlett 
Mr. James M. Rooney 
Mr. George Ross 
Mrs. Sylvia Ross 
Mrs. Frank Scofield 
Mr. Josiah B. Shurtleff 
Miss Edna G. Smith 
Mr. Arthur W. Solomon 
Mrs. Markham W. Stackpole 
Mrs. Pierpont L. Stackpole 
Dr. B. Strout Stevens 
Mrs. Blanche Stitt 
Mr. Arthur P. Stone 
Mr. John W. Sweetser 
Mr. G. Harold Thurlow 
Mrs. Frank A. Torrey 
Mr. Thomas F. Wall 
Mrs. Paul C. Washburn 
Mr. Edward H. Weeks 
Mrs. Arthur W. Wellington 
Mrs. Richard Wheatland 
Mrs. Raymond L. Whitman 
C. Wilson 



56 



Some Important Thoughts on Bequests to the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Consistently rising costs for activities and maintenance have made 
the Society more dependent on the generosity of its members if it is 
to contribute to the ever increasing development of horticultural influence 
and achievement throughout the country. 

Although the Society enjoys an enviable reputation for its sound 
financial condition and its judicious method of handling investments, the 
income from Endowment Funds no longer provides the comfortable 
economic cushion existing several years ago. 

Therefore, it is hoped the Massachusetts Horticultural Society will be 
remembered by those individuals who wish to distribute their funds for 
public benefaction in the field of arts and sciences. 

A convenient form of Bequest appears below for those who agree the 
Society should carry on and extend its services "for the advancement of 
horticulture." 




Form of Bequest 

I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum of 

to be used as the Board of Trustees 

may direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various 
forms and for extending the activities of the Society along 
educational lines. 

Signed